STORY PLACEMENT

 THIS STORY TAKES

 PLACE BETWEEN THE BIG

 FINISH AUDIO DRAMAS

 "SWORD OF ORION" AND

 "MINUET IN HELL."

 

 PRODUCTION CODE

 8D

 

 WRITTEN BY

 PAUL MAGRS

 

 DIRECTED BY

 GARY RUSSELL

 

 WORKING TITLE

 MY LAST DUCHESS

 

 RECOMMENDED 

 PURCHASE

 BIG FINISH CD#18

 (ISBN 1-903654-25-4)

 RELEASED IN MARCH

 2001.

 

 BLURB  

 THe Doctor and

 Charley VISIT VENICE 

 AS THE GREAT CITY

 PREPARES TO SINK

 BENEATH THE WATER

 FOR THE LAST TIME.

 

 THE MACHINATIONS OF A

 LOVE-SICK ARISTOCRAT,

 AN ART HISTORIAN AND

 A RABID HIGH PRIEST OF

 A REALLY QUITE DODGY

 CULT COMBINE TO MAKE

 VENICE'S SWANWONG A

 NIGHT TO REMEMBER.

 

 AND THEN THERE'S THE

 MYSTERY OF A MISSING

 CORPSE AND THE TRUTH

 BEHIND A CURSE GOING

 BACK FURTHER THAN

 CURSES USUALLY DO...

 

 PREVIOUS                                                                                  NEXT

 

The Stones

of Venice

MARCH 2001

(4 EPISODES)

 

 

                                                       

   

 

What is it with Paul Magrs? With most Doctor Who writers, by the time that Iíve

got a couple of their stories under my belt, Iím able to gauge whether or not I like their style. Paul Magrsí work, however, constantly confounds me. Some of it I find utterly enchanting; so much so that Iím left wondering why heís writing Doctor Who and not topping international bestseller charts. The rest of it, though, I find completely impenetrable, which is really quite bizarre when one considers that his work is so infamously distinctive; inimitable, even. And whilst I canít adequately articulate why some of Magrsí stories prove to be such resounding hits with me whereas others donít, I am at least able to say that The Stones of Venice really doesnít work for me. Not at all.

 

Magrsí premise is certainly one that fires the imagination - a futuristic Venice sinking into

the water, an evil curse, a revolution Ė but for some reason the plot never quite drew me in. Perhaps this is because The Stones of Venice so patently pays homage to literary classics such as Wuthering Heights, A Room with a View, and even Shakespeareís Twelfth Night - texts with which Iím not familiar and, ultimately, not all that interested in.

 

© Big Finish Productions 2001. No copyright infringement is intended.

 

Matters arenít helped by the playís

heightened feel. The events and the

characters portrayed are so embroi-

dered that the play feels as much like

a nursery rhyme as it does a Doctor

Who adventure. As one would expect,

The League of Gentlemenís Mark Gatiss revels in the richness of the material; as does series stalwart Michael Sheard (Remembrance

of the Daleks, et al), who puts in a wonderful turn as the moribund, disconsolate wreck that is Count Orsino; and Elaine Ives-Cameron, who plays his execrable flame Estella. Paul McGann and India Fisher, however, each feel a little lost, fervently tearing through a world where they donít quite fit. Who knows? Perhaps thatís the point Iím missing.

 

Indeed, unlike most stories that I donít get on well with, I can at least see that The Stones of Venice is sure to really arouse a niche audience. Distinctive and baroque, and dripping with Magrsí typically delectable dialogue, those that like this one are sure to love it.

 

Copyright © E.G. Wolverson 2006

 

E.G. Wolverson has asserted his right under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act, 1988 to be identified as the author of this work.

Unless otherwise stated, all images on this site are copyrighted to the BBC and are used solely for promotional purposes.

ĎDoctor Whoí is copyright © by the BBC. No copyright infringement is intended.